Friday, December 14, 2007

Snapster Saga Over--Rasprodz Prevails

An anonymous tipster tipped us off today that Napster, in a surprise move, withdrew its opposition to the Snapster trademark application filed by Rasprodz. The US Trademark Office has yet to accept officially accept it, but there is no reason to believe that it won't.

No reason was given by Napster. It simply said:

Napster, LLC by and through their attorneys, hereby stipulates that the above-identified opposition proceeding be dismissed. December 4, 2007

Quite possibly the two parties reached an agreement or perhaps Napster simply gave up or thought they could not win it. It appeared to us that Napster had the better argument.

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1 comment:

hugh said...

Broadcasting digital radio via satellite is not something new and concepts of doings this have been with us for a few years. From the early days of satellite radio, companies like Dish Network have offered digital audio channels as part of their programs. The breakthrough in popularity of satellite radio, however, happened just recently, when the technology became more permissive.

Satellite radio was very rare on moving locations, such as boats or cars, mostly because there was the need for some expensive equipment – a tracking dish. This was a strong deterrent which kept satellite radio quite unknown by the general public. Today, however, one can receive digital audio satellite broadcasts by using a small, GPS-like antenna. This greatly increased the feasibility of the satellite radio systems and more and more vehicle owners began considering satellite radios as a good source of music and news.

The birth of satellite radio in the United States
When the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allocated a spectrum in the "S" band (2.3 GHz) for the broadcasting of digital radio services in 1992 no one thought the amplitude that the system would take in the future. From the initial Digital Audio Radio Service (DARS) things progressed until two companies were given licenses to broadcast digital radio in 1997. These two were American Mobile Radio (today known as XM Satellite Radio) and CD Radio (presently called Sirius Satellite Radio).

The fact that satellite radio is nationwide makes it a very attractive media channel, both for commercial and non-profit organizations. The two companies that initiated the development of satellite radio saw the huge potential it had, since it wasn’t confined by the limitations of other terrestrial broadcasters.

Benefits of using satellite radio
Here are some of the most noteworthy benefits of having a satellite radio system:

* No more geographical limitations – since the radio program is broadcast through a satellite you don’t have to switch radio stations every time you leave a certain coverage area.

* The digital quality of the satellite radio has some amazing benefits on its own. There are no noise disturbances that were traditional to FM and AM broadcasts. The transmission is crystal clear and satellite radio receives some valuable points when broadcasting quality is concerned.

* Analog radio stations simply cannot broadcast the full range of sounds available through digital satellite radio.

* Both XM Radio and Sirius Radio can be picked up on all the US territory and they are also available in some parts of Canada and Mexico
http://www.satelliteradioadvisor.info/